azhure: (me phoenix)

Found via Theodora Goss’ blog, which is always amazing:

“I am one of the searchers. There are, I believe, millions of us. We are not unhappy, but neither are we really content. We continue to explore life, hoping to uncover its ultimate secret. We continue to explore ourselves, hoping to understand. We like to walk along the beach, we are drawn by the ocean, taken by its power, its unceasing motion, its mystery and unspeakable beauty. We like forests and mountains, deserts and hidden rivers, and the lonely cities as well. Our sadness is as much a part of our lives as is our laughter. To share our sadness with one we love is perhaps as great a joy as we can know – unless it be to share our laughter. We searchers are ambitious only for life itself, for everything beautiful it can provide. Most of all we love and want to be loved. We want to live in a relationship that will not impede our wandering, nor prevent our search, nor lock us in prison walls; that will take us for what little we have to give. We do not want to prove ourselves to another or compete for love.”

Oh, yes.

Mirrored from Stephanie Gunn.

azhure: (dreaming tree)

One of the recent events that will always resonate with me was watching Catherynne M Valente speak at Strowlercon are share her Monstrous Manifesto.

I make no pretence at having anything but love and gratitude that someone like Cat exists in this world, and that she shares her words and worlds with us.

And she’s done it again with her guest of honor speech at Mythcon (full speech at Cat’s livejournal), but I had to share this:

Let me tell you, I am a mouthy, aggressive, ambitious woman. I have been a known monster for quite some time. And to be a woman is to be monstrous, to be queer is to be monstrous, to have a body that is not white, that is sick or broken, that is even the littlest bit out of compliance with an increasingly unreal eidolon is monstrous. To be poor, to be other than Christian, to be old–we’re the ones who live in the frightening forest, waiting to prey on everyone else. It’s not really a metaphor–culture treats all of us as though our souls are catching, as though we must be contained and punished and shown to be wicked, made to dance in iron shoes, so that no further good folk will step out of line. After all, a gay teacher will make his students gay. A single mother will ruin her sons. A career woman will steal treasure from noble knights. As social powerlessness grows, scapegoats must be found. Strong, pale men with might on their side must be dispatched to triumph. Dragon bad; sword pretty.

 

 

 

 

 

Mirrored from Stephanie Gunn.

azhure: (dreaming tree)

An amazing interview with Paolo Bacigalupi

This quote in particular leapt out at me:

For me I actually knew that I had a great deal of talent. I knew that I was a really great writer in high school. My writing teachers were amazing. When I went to college I could write essays and all that stuff—really tight, clean stuff. And having the raw ability…it was meaningless, ultimately. It was the willingness to write four novels and fuck them all up and keep going that was the definer. It wasn’t the ability at all. Yeah, the willingness to accept failure and not let it stop you, and to not let that define you.
And this:

I realized I’d actually been carrying a lot of baggage from people who would make offhand comments like, ‘well, it’s not like you’re working.’

I was still accumulating some sort of psychic pain over it. You know, that all these people really did think I was a loser, and slacking around and doing nothing, basically. And when you’re writing your fifth book, and four of them have already failed, you’re obviously a joke, right?

So I remember when those book sales happened, I remember feeling like I could finally stand up straight and look certain people in the eye and say, Wo the next time you see me sitting around in the coffee shop, or the next time you see me sitting out on the porch, quote, ‘doing nothing,’ it turns out I’m actually working. You motherfuckers.

Yes.  And now I think I really need to move The Windup Girl to the top of my to-be-read mountain.

Mirrored from Stephanie Gunn.

azhure: (Default)

From The Guide to Literary Agents interview with Jim McCarthy:

“If you think you can give up writing, then give it up. If you can’t … if you know that no matter how much stress or rejection or frustration you face, that you can never stop writing? In that case, never give up. Publishing is too hard to face if you aren’t in it for the right reasons. But it’s not too hard to break into if it’s what you need to do.”

Mirrored from Stephanie Gunn.

azhure: (Default)

From The Guide to Literary Agents interview with Jim McCarthy:

“If you think you can give up writing, then give it up. If you can’t … if you know that no matter how much stress or rejection or frustration you face, that you can never stop writing? In that case, never give up. Publishing is too hard to face if you aren’t in it for the right reasons. But it’s not too hard to break into if it’s what you need to do.”

Mirrored from Stephanie Gunn.

azhure: (Default)

I don ‘t often suffer from classic writer’s block.  But this is a good quote from Hemingway, lifted from this post:

The best way is always to stop when you are going good and when you know what will happen next. If you do that every day … you will never be stuck. Always stop while you are going good and don’t think about it or worry about it until you start to write the next day. That way your subconscious will work on it all the time. But if you think about it consciously or worry about it you will kill it and your brain will be tired before you start.

The rest of the post is worth reading, too, as is most of the blog.

Mirrored from Stephanie Gunn.

azhure: (Default)

I don ‘t often suffer from classic writer’s block.  But this is a good quote from Hemingway, lifted from this post:

The best way is always to stop when you are going good and when you know what will happen next. If you do that every day … you will never be stuck. Always stop while you are going good and don’t think about it or worry about it until you start to write the next day. That way your subconscious will work on it all the time. But if you think about it consciously or worry about it you will kill it and your brain will be tired before you start.

The rest of the post is worth reading, too, as is most of the blog.

Mirrored from Stephanie Gunn.

Profile

azhure: (Default)
sister awakened

January 2017

S M T W T F S
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031    

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Sep. 23rd, 2017 05:52 am
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios